Super Simple Lumber Rack

I like to build things just as much as the next guy, but sometimes it makes sense to just buy it. That is the case with a lumber rack in my opinion. Here is a super easy way to get a really strong lumber rack into your shop.

Because of how simple this is there really is no need to make one. Spend 15 minutes installing this or a day or two building and installing one. It’s a no-brainer in my opinion.

Here are some links to the products I used for my lumber rack.

ClosetMaid 2808 ShelfTrack 60-Inch Standard, White

ClosetMaid 2854 ShelfTrack 16-Inch Locking Shelf Bracket, White

The links above are affiliate links.  That means by purchasing through my link I get a small kickback and you get the same price you would if you didn’t purchase through my link.

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Installing a Woodshop Dust Collection System

As you may know, I recently moved to a new shop where I’m building furniture full time.  This gave me the opportunity to overhaul my old dust collection system.  Previously the system used a 2hp single stage collector with 4″ flex hose running to all my machines.  I was never happy with its performance and assumed it was the fault of the collector since my shop at the time was small and the runs were short.

The new system uses the same 2hp collector but the ducting is 6″ diameter HVAC metal ducting with 4″ diameter flex hose only at the tool.  This system performs so much better than my old set up.  I now blame the olds system poor performance solely on the flex hose.  

Check out the video below to see how I installed the new system and look below the video for links to the products I used in building it.

Items used in building the dust collection system:

Midwest Ducts 30 Gauge Galvanized Pipe – 6″ x 5′

4″ x 10′ Clear Flex Hose

Ideal-Air 750105 Adjustable 90 Degree Elbow, 6″

Speedi-Products SM-RDP 65 6-Inch by 5-Inch Round Galvanized Plain Reducer

Single Wall Galvanized Metal Duct Reducer 5″ to 4″ / 5″ x 4″

6″ x 6″ x 6″ Sheet Metal Duct Wye Branch HVAC

Nashua Aluminum Waterproofing Repair Foil Tape, 11 mil Thick, 10 m Length, 48 mm Width

Diversitech 710-001 Galvanized Duct Hanging Strap 1 x 100 Ft

POWERTEC 70108 4-Inch Blast Gate for Vacuum/Dust Collector

Woodstock W1023 5-Inch Hose Clamp

There are a few more pieces that i need to find again but this will get you started,

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Moving a 2,000 Pound Jointer

I recently purchased a L. Power & Co. 12″ jointer.  It is massive and made completely of cast iron.  

I got a great deal on the jointer but of course I had to move it from its current location to my new shop.  This presented some challenges.  Here is the video of the move.

To get the job done I enlisted the help of my Dad and a few friends, Gib Clark and Mark Saunders.  Gib is one of those guys who knows a lot about a lot of things and he was instrumental in getting this job done.  Mark was generous enough to let us use his truck to haul the jointer in the U-Haul trailer that I rented and my Dad was the extra muscle.

We stated moving the jointer by removing the 3 phase 5 horsepower motor and blade guard.  This just make the jointer a little easier to maneuver through the shop.  Then we slid the jointer on to a 2×12 and used a pry bar to get some short lengths of conduit pipe under the 2×12.  This allowed us to roll the jointer to the other end of the shop where the garage door was located.  

Once we had the jointer to the door we were fortunate enough to be able to use the owner’s Bobcat to lift the jointer out of the shop and onto the trailer that I rented.  

Gib brought some tow straps that we used to provide spots to lift the jointer from using the forks on the Bobcat.  Once we got the jointer off the ground, placing it in the trailer was a piece of cake.

From there is was only a 3 mile drive to my shop.  At my shop we unloaded the jointer using a chain fall that Gib attached to a beam on my ceiling with some steel rope.  We simply backed the trailer into my shop, and used the same tow straps to attach the jointer to the chain fall.  We then very easily lifted the jointer off of the trailer and drove the trailer out from under it.  

To get the jointer into its spot in my shop we lowered it on to the metal conduit pipes again and rolled it into place.

This could have been a much more difficult process and I really want to thank my Dad, Gib and Mark for all their help.  I never could have done it with out them.

 

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Building a Split-Top Roubo Workbench

Recently The Dusty Life Podcast hosted a workbench build off. I decided to build a split-top Roubo bench.

The bench measures 6′ long by 24″ wide and 34.75″ high. The top and base are made from SPF construction lumber. The leg vise chop, wagon vise and sliding deadman are mahogany and the planing stop is walnut. The bench has other walnut accents as well such as the vise handles and hubs. 

Having a real workbench in the shop is a real game changer. I can’t believe I waited so long to build one. Check the videos below to see the build process. 


DIY Diamond Discs for WorkSharp WS3000

I’ve had my WorkSharp WS3000 for around a year now and I love it.  It is super fast and repeatable, two things I really enjoy about a sharpening system.  It is also very clean compared to water stones.  What I don’t like about the WS3000 is that the paper abrasives used to sharpen your plane irons and chisels wears out rather quickly and it isn’t cheap.

There are other options out there for diamond discs for the WS3000 but the reviews weren’t great and I wasn’t about to spend around $150 to get the whole set up to find that I wasn’t satisfied.

Recently I put out a video about tuning up an old Stanley No. 93 shoulder plane.  In the comments section of that video it was mentioned that I should make my own diamond discs.  That is exactly what I did.

Check the video below to see how I did it.  And if you’re interested in doing this yourself you’ll find links to everything I bought after the video.

Work Sharp WS3000 Wood Tool Sharpener

6″ 120Grit Diamond Lapidary Faceting Flat Lap

uxcell® 6″ Stone Granite Diamond Grinding Wheel Disc 400 Grit

6″ 1200Grit Diamond Lapidary Faceting Flat Lap

Flexible Magnet Sheet With Adhesive, 0.030″ Thick, 12″ Wide, 24″ Length (1 sheet rolled inside tube)

The above links are all Amazon affiliate links.

Making a Simple Marking Gauge

In my quest to become more proficient with hand tools I decided to make myself a marking gauge.  Want to see how I did it?

I was pretty simple.  The reference surface is just a piece of walnut I turned on my lathe.  The shaft is a piece of 3/8″ round bar and I simply used a thumb screw to secure it in place on the shaft.  The cutter is a 15mm round carbide cutter I purchased from Easy Wood Tools.

Making a Marking Knife

If you’ve been following my work for the last few months you know that I’ve been working on my hand cut dovetails.  In fact I recently finished my first project with them, a dovetailed keepsake box.  During this project I realized that I needed some additional tools, mostly a marking knife.  So instead of going out to buy one, I set out to make one.  Here’s how I did it!

Making a Carver’s Mallet

I recently cut my first set of hand cut dovetails.  In the process I realized that I needed a proper mallet, among other tools.  I decided that I’ve been woodworking for too long not to have a mallet so it was off to the lathe to turn a carver’s mallet.

I make the mallet from a glued up blank of walnut and maple.  If you’d like to see how I did it check out the video below.

Sharpening with the WorkSharp WS3000

Recently I got a new tool in the shop.  It the WorkSharp WS3000 and it makes sharpening my chisels and plane irons really fast and really easy.  Here’s a video I made showing how easily it allows me to take a beat up chisel and make it cut like new.

 

Before I had the WS3000 I used water stones to sharpen my tools.  These work great but compared to the WS3000 they are a pain to use.  I just got so tired to dealing with the mess.  Getting out the water, soaking the stones, then of course the actual sharpening and trying to keep the stones flat.

The WS3000 gets me working wood again quickly, and because of that I’m all about it.

Purchase the WorkSharp WS3000 (affiliate link): http://www.amazon.com/Work-Sharp-WS3000-Wood-Sharpener/dp/B000PVHIMW/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1443898943&sr=1-1&keywords=WS3000